Link to Photosynthesis Student Learning Guide

Page Outline

  1. Introduction
  2. Photosynthesis as an Endergonic Redox (Oxidation Reduction) Reaction
  3. Quiz: Photosynthesis the Big Picture

1. Introducing Photosynthesis

Start by labeling the diagram below. Use a process of elimination if you get stuck.

[qwiz qrecord_id=”sciencemusicvideosMeister1961-PSN, Inputs and Outputs Diagram”]

[h]Interactive Diagram: Photosynthesis inputs and outputs

[q labels = “top”]

 

[l]carbohydrate

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]carbon dioxide

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]light

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]oxygen

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]water

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[/qwiz]

For a minute, let’s think about life.

Living things are entities that, chemically speaking, are profoundly out of equilibrium with their environment. We (meaning people, cacti, sea anemones, redwood trees, bacteria, and every other organism) are systems that are highly organized. On a molecular level, we’re composed of highly reduced compounds, each buzzing with energetic electrons. Order and potential energy like that doesn’t happen spontaneously. It needs an energy source to sustain it.

That energy source is the sun (“1”), and photosynthesis is the biological process that brings that energy and highly organized matter into living systems. Life’s chemical energy is stored in a variety of forms: immediately as ATP, a form of energy that, for the most part, is locked within individual cells, and can’t be transferred from one cell to another. A form that can be transferred from cell to cell is sugar, and that’s one of photosynthesis’s most direct products. The sugars made by photosynthesis are simple carbohydrates, and plants can convert them into more complex carbohydrates such as starches and cellulose (plant fiber: the material that makes up cell walls). In the diagram above, carbohydrate is represented by number 5. Essentially, it’s the plant itself.

Carbohydrates (along with proteins and fats) constitute one output of the photosynthetic process. Another one is oxygen (shown at “4”). All of the oxygen in our atmosphere is there because of photosynthesis, which has been bubbling oxygen into the air for the past 3.5 billion years. Life can exist without atmospheric oxygen. But we can’t. If you get excited by anything connected with multicellular life (which ranges from the shape of an orchid to conflict resolution among primates), then you can thank photosynthesis for creating the oxygen that made the complexity of multicellular aerobic life possible.

So, that’s what comes out. Let’s think about what goes in. Photosynthesis involves carbon fixation, which involves taking carbon dioxide gas (“2” in the diagram above) and rendering it into a solid form as carbohydrate (and, through other reactions, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids). You can think of fixation as fixing into place.

Carbon dioxide is a minor component of our atmosphere. At the start of the industrial revolution (let’s say 1800), carbon dioxide’s atmospheric concentration was about 280 parts per million. Now it’s above 400, a product of human combustion of fossil fuels (click here for my climate change songs). During photosynthesis, plants and other photosynthetic organisms (including algae and photosynthetic bacteria), absorb carbon dioxide into their cells and combine it with electrons and protons ripped away from water molecules (water is the second input, shown above at “3”).

Taking unorganized, randomly moving molecules in the air and organizing them into cells and multicellular organisms is a massive push against entropy. To try to envision this, just take a look at your hand: an organized structure. The bone, skin, and muscle in your hand is mostly protein. Protein, like every other biological molecule, is a carbon-based molecule. Every one of the carbon atoms making up the molecules that make up the cells that make up the tissues that make up your hand, was once, not very long ago floating freely in the air.

It’s a good thing that the sun puts out so much energy. This is not something that most people can imagine, but think about all the energy that human beings use in a year: all the electricity powering all of the lights and machines; all of the fossil fuel derived combustion that heats our homes and moves our vehicles, all of the energy required to make everything we use. That amount, all over our planet, sustaining our civilization, is equal to an hour and a half of sunlight striking the earth (based on the Sandia Labs Solar FRQ. The calculation was based on human energy consumption the year 2001. We undoubtedly consume more energy now, so maybe it would take the sun two hours in 2017).

In what follows, we’ll drop down to the cellular and molecular details of how photosynthesis work. Let’s go.

2. Photosynthesis as an endergonic redox (oxidation reduction) reaction

Photosynthesis is a complex process, with many intermediate steps that we’ll learn about in this and the coming modules. But let’s make sure we understand the big picture first. Here’s the chemical equation for photosynthesis:

6CO2 + 6H2O + light energy –> C6H12O6 + 6O2.

In words, that means that six molecules of carbon dioxide are combined with six molecules of water, producing one molecule of glucose and six molecules of oxygen. Two things about this equation tell us that the reaction is endergonic (not spontaneous, requiring an input of energy to move it forward).

  1. The fact that energy isn’t coming out, but gets put in. That’s evident in light energy’s place on the left side of the arrow.
  2. The negative entropy change. Twelve molecules go into photosynthesis. Seven molecules come out. That’s a decrease in entropy. If you had twelve piles of things in your room and you organized them into seven piles, you’d have increased your room’s level of organization. Increasing organization requires energy.

For a review of the idea of free energy, read this.

Note that photosynthesis is the inverse of what happens during cellular respiration.

  • Photosynthesis: 6CO2 + 6H2O + light energy –> C6H12O6 + 6O2
  • Respiration: C6H12O6 + 6O2 –>  energy(ATP) + 6CO2 + 6H2O

During photosynthesis, carbon dioxide is reduced. That means that carbon dioxide gains energetic electrons. Those electrons come from water, which is oxidized (loses electrons). It’s important to emphasize that water doesn’t power photosynthesis. The power comes from light, and how light powers the oxidation of water is something that we’ll visit later in this series of tutorials. Note that this is, of course, also the inverse of what happens during cellular respiration, where glucose is oxidized as water is reduced.

The reduction of carbon dioxide that happens during photosynthesis is the basis of all of life’s chemical energy. Life is based on highly reduced, energetic molecules. Think of vegetable oil, or a piece of bread. In fact, for an image of a reduced matter, think of a peanut butter sandwich. It’s literally dripping with energy. And that’s what photosynthesis does: it takes highly oxidized carbon dioxide, commonly referred to as exhaust (what comes out of a car’s tailpipe) and transforms it into highly reduced living matter (carbohydrates, which then get transformed into proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids).

05_psn and resp (chlor and mito)Let’s end this section by looking at a diagram that shows the reciprocal relationship between photosynthesis and respiration, and locates these processes in the cellular organelles in which these reactions take place. Note that, for the purpose of showing the reciprocity, the diagram oversimplifies the inputs into cellular respiration.

The key organelles are the chloroplast (“2”), which is the site of photosynthesis; and the mitochondria (“5”) the site of most cellular respiration. Because this is a cycle we could begin anywhere, but let’s start with the inputs of photosynthesis. These are the gas carbon dioxide (“6”) and the liquid water (“7”). Powered by light (“1”), a chloroplast converts these inputs into the simple sugar glucose (“3”) and oxygen gas (“4”). These outputs of photosynthesis become the inputs for cellular respiration, the goal of which is to produce the short term energy molecule ATP, which would appear at “8” in this diagram.

Before entering into more detail about photosynthesis, let’s make sure you’re on top of the material covered above.

3. Quiz: Photosynthesis, the big picture

[qwiz random = “false” qrecord_id=”sciencemusicvideosMeister1961-PSN, Big Picture”]

[h]Photosynthesis: the big picture.

[i]

[!!]continue, fix this question, START HERE  [/!!!]

[q labels = “top” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d2867ebbbc7b4″ question_number=”8″]

The energy for all life is provided by the ______ . Within plant cells, organelles called ______________  take up __________________ (a gas) and  _________. Through the process of __________________, ______________ create the sugar _________  and release _________ as a by-product. In both plant and animal cells,  ________________ take in_________ (gas) and __________. During cellular _____________, mitochondria will produce  ________, and release the gas __________________ and __________. These, in turn, become the inputs for _________________.

[l]ATP

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]carbon dioxide

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]chloroplasts

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]glucose

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]mitochondria

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]oxygen

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]photosynthesis

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]respiration

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]sun

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]water

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

 

[!]++++Question 1+++[/!!!]

[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” question_number=”1″ dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d2c08ea4423b4″] Which number represents the substance that gets reduced during photosynthesis?

[textentry single_char=”true”]

[c*] 2

[f] Yes. “2” represents carbon dioxide. During photosynthesis, carbon dioxide gets reduced to carbohydrate.

[c] *

[f] No. Here’s a hint. The reduced product of photosynthesis is carbohydrate. Look carefully at that word, and see if you can figure out input for photosynthesis could be receive electrons and protons to become carbohydrate.

[!]++++Question 2+++[/!!!]

[q multiple_choice=”true” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d2b88dbb627b4″ question_number=”2″] In biological processes like respiration and photosynthesis and respiration, substances that are reduced have _______ chemical energy than substances that are oxidized. 

[c*] more

[f] That’s right. Reduced substances (like sugars )have more energy that substances that are oxidized (like carbon dioxide)

[c] about the same amount of

[f] No. Think about a reduced substance (like sugar) and compare it to an oxidized substance (like carbon dioxide). Which one could you consume for fuel?

[c] less

[f] No. Think about a reduced substance (like sugar) and compare it to an oxidized substance (like carbon dioxide). Which one could you consume for fuel?

[!]++++Question 3+++[/!!!]

[q dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d2b121d57bbb4″ question_number=”3″] Which number represents the substance that gets oxidized during photosynthesis?

[textentry single_char=”true”]

[c*] 3

[f] Yes. “3” represents water. During photosynthesis, water gets oxidized, losing electrons and protons, becoming molecular oxygen (O2)

[c] *

[f] No. Here’s a hint. The reduced product of photosynthesis is carbohydrate. Look carefully at that word, and see if you can figure out input for photosynthesis could be receive electrons and protons to become carbohydrate.

[!]++++Question 4+++[/!!!]

[q dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d2a9b5ef94fb4″ question_number=”4″] Which number represents the reduced product of photosynthesis?

[textentry single_char=”true”]

[c*]5

[f] Yes. “5” represents the carbohydrate (sugars, cellulose) and other organic material that the plant is made of. During photosynthesis, carbon dioxide and water get combined to form these reduced organic molecules.

[c] *

[f] No. Here’s a hint. The reduced product of photosynthesis is carbohydrate (along with other organic molecules). Look carefully at the diagram, and see if you can figure out where that carbohydrate would be found.

[!]Question 5 [/!!!]

[q dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d2a2b9cbe8fb4″ question_number=”5″]Because photosynthesis requires energy to proceed, it’s considered to be an ____________ process.

[hangman]

[c]endergonic

[f]Excellent. Because photosynthesis requires energy to proceed, it’s considered to be an endergonic process.

[!]Question 6[/!!!]

[q dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d29b98677ebb4″ question_number=”6″]Because respiration releases energy for cellular work, it’s considered to be an _____________ process.

[hangman]

[c]exergonic

[f]Excellent. Because respiration releases energy for cellular work, it’s considered to be an exergonic process.

 

[!!]PASTE IN STARTING HERE [/!!!]

[q labels = “top” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d2911e31fcbb4″ question_number=”7″]

 

[l]ATP

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]carbon dioxide

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]chloroplast

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]glucose

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]light

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]mitochondria

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]oxygen

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]water

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[!!!!!!] REVIEW: question 5, END HERE +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “cellular_respiration_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d27de8cfe3bb4″ question_number=”9″]The correct chemical reaction for cellular respiration is

[c] C6H12O6 + 6CO2 + energy(ATP) –> 6CO2 + 6O2

[c*] C6H12O6 + 6O2 –> energy(ATP) + 6CO2 + 6H2O

[c] 6CO2 + 6H2O –> Energy(light) + C6H12O6 + 6O2

[c] 6H2O + 6O2  –> 6CO2 + 6H2O

[f] No. Find a reaction that begins with glucose, combines it with oxygen, and releases energy, carbon dioxide, and water.
[f] Excellent. Cellular respiration begins with glucose, combines it with oxygen, and releases energy, carbon dioxide, and water.
[f] No. Find a reaction that begins with glucose, combines it with oxygen, and releases energy, carbon dioxide, and water. This equation, by the way, is the correct equation for photosynthesis. If you reverse the reaction, you’ll have the reaction for cellular respiration.
[f] No. Find a reaction that begins with glucose, combines it with oxygen, and releases energy, carbon dioxide, and water.

[!!!!!!] REVIEW, question 1 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “cellular_respiration_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d2759d65877b4″ question_number=”10″]The function of cellular respiration is to produce

[c] carbon dioxide

[c] glucose

[c] oxygen

[c*] ATP

[c] water

[f] No. Carbon dioxide is one of the waste products of cellular respiration. Next time, look for something that cellular respiration produces that enables the cell to do some work.
[f] No. Glucose is the fuel for cellular respiration. Next time, look for something that cellular respiration produces that enables the cell to do some work.
[f] No. Oxygen is a required input for cellular respiration. You’re looking for an output. Next time, look for something that cellular respiration produces that enables the cell to do some work.
[f] Yes. Production of ATP is the goal of cellular respiration. It’s the moment to moment energy source within cells, and it’s what enables cells to get work done.
[f] No. Water is one of the waste products of cellular respiration. Next time, look for something that cellular respiration produces that enables the cell to do some work.

[!!!!!!] question 1 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d26d9c7ca7bb4″ question_number=”11″]The equation 6CO2 + 6H2O + Energy(light) C6H12O6 + 6O2 is for

[c] cellular respiration

[c] lactic acid fermentation

[c*] photosynthesis

[c] alcohol fermentation

[f] No. In cellular respiration, glucose is combined with oxygen to produce ATP, with carbon dioxide and water produced as a byproduct. The equation above shows carbon dioxide being combined with water to create glucose, with oxygen being released as a byproduct. What process creates glucose? As a hint, note that light drives the reaction.

[f] No. Lactic acid fermentation is a kind of anaerobic respiration. The equation above shows carbon dioxide being combined with water to create glucose, with oxygen being released as a byproduct. What process creates glucose? As a hint, note that light drives the reaction.

[f] Yes. The equation above shows the reaction for photosynthesis: carbon dioxide being combined with water to create glucose, with oxygen being released as a byproduct.

[f] No. Alcohol fermentation is a kind of anaerobic respiration. The equation above shows carbon dioxide being combined with water to create glucose, with oxygen being released as a byproduct. What process creates glucose? As a hint, note that light drives the reaction.

[!!!!!!] question 2 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d2652bd18d3b4″ question_number=”12″]The energy that powers photosynthesis comes from

[c] glucose

[c] oxygen

[c] carbon dioxide

[c*] light

[f] No. Glucose is the product of photosynthesis. The energy source for photosynthesis is built into the word ‘photosynthesis.’ ‘Photo’ refers to what?

[f] No. Oxygen is a byproduct of photosynthesis. The energy source for photosynthesis is built into the word ‘photosynthesis.’ ‘Photo’ refers to what?

[f] No. Carbon dioxide is an input for photosynthesis, not one of the products. The energy source for photosynthesis is built into the word ‘photosynthesis.’ ‘Photo’ refers to what?

[f] Yes. Light energy is what drives the reactions of photosynthesis.

[!!!!!!] question 3 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d25d50296bbb4″ question_number=”13″]The correct chemical equation for photosynthesis is

[c] C6H12O6 + 6CO2 + energy(ATP) -> 6CO2 + 6O2

[c] C6H12O6 + 6O2 -> energy(ATP) + 6CO2 + 6H2O

[c*] 6CO2 + 6H2O + Energy(light) -> C6H12O6 + 6O2

[c] 6H2O + 6O2 -> 6CO2 + 6H2O

[f] No. The reaction above shows glucose being combined with carbon dioxide. In photosynthesis, carbon dioxide is combined with water to create glucose, with oxygen released as a byproduct.

[f] No. In photosynthesis, carbon dioxide is combined with water to create glucose, with oxygen released as a byproduct.

[f] Yes. In photosynthesis, carbon dioxide is combined with water to create glucose, with oxygen released as a byproduct.

[f] No. Find a reaction that begins with carbon dioxide and water, and combines those inputs to create glucose, with oxygen released as a byproduct.

[!!!!!!] question 4 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d255bf02c6bb4″ question_number=”14″]The organelle that carries out photosynthesis in a plant cell is

[c] the vacuole

[c*] the chloroplast

[c] the nucleus

[c] the mitochondria

[f] No. The vacuole’s role is storage of water and other substances. For a hint about the organelle that does photosynthesis, think of the green pigment ‘chlorophyll.’ Which organelle has a similar sound?

[f] Yes. The chloroplast, which gets its name from the pigment chlorophyll, is the organelle that carries out photosynthesis.

[f] No. The nucleus is the cell’s control center. For a hint about the organelle that does photosynthesis, think of the green pigment ‘chlorophyll.’ Which organelle has a similar sound?

[f] No. The mitochondria play a key role in cellular respiration. For a hint about the organelle that does photosynthesis, think of the green pigment ‘chlorophyll.’ Which organelle has a similar sound?

[!!!!!!] question 5 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d24dbe19e6fb4″ question_number=”15″]From a plant’s perspective, the purpose of photosynthesis is production of

[c] carbon dioxide

[c] light

[c] water

[c*] carbohydrate (glucose)

[c] oxygen

[f] No. Carbon dioxide is an input for photosynthesis. From a plant’s perspective, photosynthesis is about making food. Which substance is a food?

[f] No. Light is the energy that drives photosynthesis. From a plant’s perspective, photosynthesis is about making food. Which substance is a food?

[f] No. Water is an input for photosynthesis. From a plant’s perspective, photosynthesis is about making food. Which substance is a food?

[f] Yes. From a plant’s perspective, photosynthesis is about making food; that food is carbohydrate, typically glucose.

[f] No. Oxygen is a byproduct of photosynthesis. While we’re very grateful for plants for creating oxygen, it’s not the goal of the process. From a plant’s perspective, photosynthesis is about making food. Which substance is a food?

[!!!!!!] question 6 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d245bd31073b4″ question_number=”16″]The carbon that photosynthesis puts into carbohydrates comes from

[c*] carbon dioxide

[c] light

[c] ATP

[c] glucose

[c] oxygen

[f] Yes. Carbon dioxide is the source of the carbon that photosynthesis puts into carbohydrates.

[f] No. Light is the energy that drives photosynthesis. For the source of the carbon that goes into carbohydrates, look for the choice that is both an input for photosynthesis, and which has the element carbon in it.

[f] No. ATP is an energy source for cells, but it’s not a carbon source. For the source of the carbon that goes into carbohydrates, look for the choice that is both an input for photosynthesis, and which has the element carbon in it.

[f] No. Glucose is one of the products of photosynthesis, not the energy source or carbon source. For the source of the carbon that goes into carbohydrates, look for the choice that is both an input for photosynthesis, and which has the element carbon in it.

[f] No. Oxygen is a byproduct of photosynthesis. For the source of the carbon that goes into carbohydrates, look for the choice that is both an input for photosynthesis, and which has the element carbon in it.

[!!!!!!] question 7 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d23de188e5bb4″ question_number=”17″]Photosynthesis has changed our atmosphere by adding

[c] carbon dioxide

[c*] oxygen

[c] water vapor

[f] No. Photosynthesis removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. What gas does it add to the atmosphere?

[f] Yes. Photosynthesis is responsible for the unique, oxygen-rich atmosphere of our planet.

[f] No. Water is an input for photosynthesis. Also, on our water-rich world, photosynthesis hasn’t altered the amount of water vapor in the air. What gas is an output of photosynthesis?

[!!!!!!] question 8 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d23605e0c43b4″ question_number=”18″]A photosynthesizing plant is placed in a sealed chamber from which no air can enter or leave. The lights are kept continuously on, and the plant is provided with enough water. If the level of gases in the chamber is measured, which of the following should be true?

[c] Oxygen levels go down, and carbon dioxide levels go up.

[c] Oxygen levels go up, and carbon dioxide levels go up.

[c*] Oxygen levels go up, and carbon dioxide levels go down.

[c] Oxygen levels go down, and carbon dioxide levels go down.

[f] No. Photosynthesis removes carbon dioxide from the air, and adds oxygen. How would this affect gas levels in the chamber?

[f] No. You’re right about oxygen levels, but photosynthesis removes carbon dioxide from the air. How would this affect gas levels in the chamber?

[f] Yes. Photosynthesis removes carbon dioxide from the air, and adds oxygen. That will cause the carbon dioxide level to fall, and the oxygen level to rise.

[f] No. You’re right about carbon dioxide, but photosynthesis adds oxygen to the atmosphere. How would this affect gas levels in the chamber?

[!!!!!!] question 9 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d22e4f7960fb4″ question_number=”19″]In the diagram below, which number shows a mitochondrion?

[c] 1     [c] 2     [c*] 5

[f] No. Number 1 refers to the sun.

[f] No. Number 2 refers to a chloroplast.

[f] Yes. Number 5 shows a mitochondrion.

[!!!!!!] question 10 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d22673d13f7b4″ question_number=”20″]In the diagram below, number 4 would have to be

[c*] oxygen

[c] carbon dioxide

[c] glucose

[c] water

[f] Yes. Number 4 is a gas that’s coming out of a chloroplast. The gas released from a chloroplast would have to be oxygen.

[f] No. Carbon dioxide goes IN to chloroplasts. Number 4 shows a gas leaving a chloroplast. Which gas comes out of a chloroplast?

[f] No. Number 4 is labeled as a gas, and glucose is a solid. However, you’re on the right track, insofar as you’re looking for one of the outputs of photosynthesis.

[f]No. Number 4 is a gas that’s coming out of a chloroplast. Water is a liquid that goes into a chloroplast. What gas does a chloroplast release?

[!!!!!!] question 11 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d21e2866e33b4″ question_number=”21″]In the diagram below, number 6 would have to be

[c] oxygen

[c*] carbon dioxide

[c] glucose

[c] water

[f] No. Oxygen comes out of a chloroplast (2), and goes into the mitochondrion (5). Number six is a gas that is an input of photosynthesis and an output of respiration. What substance could play those two roles?

[f] Yes. Number 6 is carbon dioxide, which goes into chloroplasts as an input of photosynthesis, and comes out of the mitochondrion as a waste product of cellular respiration.

[f] No. Glucose is a solid that comes out of photosynthesis, and goes into the mitochondrion (5). Number six is a gas that is an input of photosynthesis and an output of respiration. What substance could play those two roles?

[f] No. Oxygen comes out of the chloroplast (2), and goes into the mitochondrion (5). Number six is a gas that is an input of photosynthesis and an output of respiration. What substance could play those two roles?

[!!!!!!] question 12 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d216277e037b4″ question_number=”22″]In the diagram below, number 7 would have to be

[c] oxygen

[c] carbon dioxide

[c] glucose

[c*] water

[f] No. Oxygen is shown at 4. It’s a gas that comes out of a chloroplast (2), and goes into the mitochondrion (5). What liquid goes into photosynthesis and comes out of respiration?

[f] No. Carbon dioxide is shown at 6. What liquid goes into photosynthesis and comes out of respiration?

[f] No. Glucose is a solid that comes out of photosynthesis, and goes into the mitochondrion. It’s shown at 3. What liquid goes into photosynthesis and comes out of respiration?

[f] Yes. Water is the liquid that comes out of respiration (which occurs in the mitochondrion) and which goes into photosynthesis (which occurs in the chloroplast).

[!!!!!!] question 13 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d20ddc13a73b4″ question_number=”23″]In the diagram below, ATP would have to be

[c] 6     [c] 7     [c*] 8     [c] 3     [c] 4

[f] No. Number 6 is carbon dioxide. ATP is produced in a mitochondrion during cellular respiration (and it’s not an input for photosynthesis)

[f] No. Number 7 is water. ATP is produced in a mitochondrion during cellular respiration (and it’s not an input for photosynthesis)

[f] Yes. Number 8 is ATP. ATP is produced in a mitochondrion during cellular respiration (and it’s not an input for photosynthesis)

[f] No. Water is shown at 7. ATP is produced in a mitochondrion during cellular respiration (and it’s not an input for photosynthesis)

[f] No. Number 4 is oxygen. ATP is produced in a mitochondrion during cellular respiration (and it’s not an input for photosynthesis)

[!!!!!!] question 14 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d205b5ea093b4″ question_number=”24″]In the diagram below, number 3 would have to be

[c] oxygen

[c] carbon dioxide

[c*] glucose

[c] water

[f] No. Oxygen is shown at 4. It’s the gas that comes out of a chloroplast (2), and goes into the mitochondrion (5). Number 3 is a solid that comes out of photosynthesis and goes into respiration. What substance could play those two roles?

[f] No. Carbon dioxide is shown at 6. Number 3 is a solid that comes out of photosynthesis and goes into respiration. What substance could play those two roles?

[f] Yes. Glucose is shown at 3. It’s the solid that comes out of photosynthesis, and goes into the mitochondrion for cellular respiration.

[f] No. Water is shown at 7. Number 3 a solid that comes out of photosynthesis and goes into respiration. What substance could play those two roles?

[!!!!!!] question 15 +++++++++[/!!!!!!]
[q topic= “photosynthesis_overview” dataset_id=”SMV_PSN_The_Big_Picture|d1faf1330abb4″ question_number=”25″]In the diagram below, number 4 would have to be

[c*] oxygen

[c] carbon dioxide

[c] glucose

[c] water

[f] Yes. Oxygen is shown at 4. It’s the gas that comes out of a chloroplast (2), and goes into the mitochondrion (5).

[f] No. Carbon dioxide is shown at 6. Number 4 is a gas that is released by a chloroplast, and which goes into the mitochondrion. What substance could play those two roles?

[f] No. Glucose is shown at 3. It’s the energy-rich solid that comes out of photosynthesis, and goes into the mitochondrion for cellular respiration. Number 4 is a gas that is released by a chloroplast, and which goes into the mitochondrion. What substance could play those two roles?

[f] No. Water is shown at 7. Number 4 is a gas that is released by a chloroplast, and which goes into the mitochondrion. What substance could play those two roles?

[!!!]END PASTE HERE[/!!!]

[x][restart]

[/qwiz]

 

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  1. Photosynthesis 2: The Two Phases of Photosynthesis (the next tutorial in this series)
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