1. The Respiratory System: An Overview

The respiratory system is how we bring oxygen into our bodies so that it can be absorbed into the blood, and how we get carbon dioxide out of our blood, so that it can be exhaled from the body. Its key organs are

  1. the lungs, which provide huge surface area for absorbing gases
  2. The series of hollow tubes (such as the trachea and bronchial tubes)  that bring gases to and from the lungs
  3. The diaphragm and rib muscles that power the flow of gases in and out of our bodies.

To help you understand how this system works, let’s follow a molecule of oxygen that’s just outside your nose, and see how it makes its way into your lungs (indicated by 8a and 8b, below).

That oxygen would start by passing through the opening to your nose, the nostrils, and then pass into the nasal passages (1). These passages are covered with cells that secrete mucus, which traps germs and dust. These nasal passages, in addition to filtering the air, also warm the air as it enters your body. Some of that air also circulates in your sinuses (shown at “2”).

You can also, of course, breathe through your mouth. The mouth and nasal cavity join at the back of the throat, also called the pharynx (“3”). After the pharynx, our oxygen molecule would move through the voicebox, or larynx, shown at “4.”

The voicebox sits on the top of the trachea (5), a hollow tube held open by rings of cartilage. Just below our collarbone, the trachea splits into two main branches. These are the bronchi, one of which branches into the left lung (6b), and the other into the right lung (6a). And the the same way as a tree trunk breaks into smaller and smaller branches, so does the right and left bronchial trees (shown at 7a and 7b)

Below the lungs is a sheet of tissue with attached muscle. This is the diaphragm, and we’ll see below how it acts to bring air into and out of the lungs.

Now let’s see how that oxygen molecule is going to get absorbed into the bloodstream. Number 1 shows the smallest branch of the bronchial tree: a bronchiole. The bronchiole brings air to tiny, thin-walled sacs of tissue called alveoli (at 2). So, imagine you’ve just inhaled and drawn in breathe of air. That air will proceed all the way down to the alveoli. The alveoli are surrounded by capillaries, the smallest blood vessels (shown at 3). Oxygen will move by diffusion from the alveoli to the capillaries? Why, because the blood in the capillaries arrived there from one of the pulmonary arteries (4), which brought it deoxygenated blood from the heart. Because deoxygenated blood is low in oxygen, the oxygen flows from where it’s in higher concentration (in the alveoli) to the capillaries (which oxygen is in low concentration).

Now loaded with oxygen, blood will return to the left side of the heart though larger and larger branches of the pulmonary veins (5).

Let’s now zoom in to the closest level: a single alveolus (singular of alveoli). This alveolus is shown at “2.” Blood entering the capillary, at “1” is deoxygenated. Carbon dioxide will flow from the blood into the alveolus (as shown at “3”). Oxygen will flow from the alveolus  into the blood (as shown at “4”). By point “5,” the blood is oxygenated. It will return to the heart through the pulmonary veins, and then be pumped to the body to power cellular respiration.

2. Interactive Diagrams

[qwiz qrecord_id=”sciencemusicvideosMeister1961-Resp Sys Interactive Diagrams”]

[h]Interactive Diagrams: Respiratory System

[q labels = “left”]

 

[l]bronchial tubes

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]diaphragm

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]epiglottis

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]larynx

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]lung

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]mouth

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]nasal cavity

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]nostrils

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]pharynx

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]right bronchus

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]sinuses

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]trachea

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[q labels = “left”]

 

[l]alveoli

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]bronchiole

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]capillary bed

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]pulmonary artery

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]pulmonary vein

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[!]Functions at the alveoli

[q labels = “top”]

 

[l]passageway for air

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]deoxygenated blood

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]exchange of O2 and CO2

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]oxygenated blood

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[!!!]One alveolus

[q]

 

[l]alveolus

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]artery

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]capillary

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]CO2 leaves blood

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]deoxygenated

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]oxygenated

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]O2 enters blood

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]vein

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[/qwiz]

3. Sequencing Air Intake

Pretend that you’re a molecule of oxygen outside someone’s nose. Drag the choices below to show the sequence of structures that this molecule would pass through as it made its way into your bloodstream and your heart.

[qwiz qrecord_id=”sciencemusicvideosMeister1961-Sequencing Air Intake, Interactive Table, Resp Sys”]

[h]Interactive Table: An Oxygen Molecule’s Passage to the heart

[q labels= “left”]

First:  ___________________________
Second:   ___________________________
Third:   ___________________________
Fourth:  ___________________________
Fifth:  ___________________________
Sixth:  ___________________________
Seventh:  ___________________________
Eighth:   ___________________________
Ninth:   ___________________________
Tenth:  ___________________________
Eleventh:  ___________________________
Twelfth:  ___________________________

[l]an alveolus

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]a bronchiole (smallest tube)

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]bronchus (left or right)

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]a capillary bed

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]larynx

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]nasal cavity

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]nostrils

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]pharynx

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]pulmonary veins

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]left atrium of the heart

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]a smaller bronchial tube

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]trachea

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[/qwiz]

4. Breathe! Interactive Lyrics

[qwiz qrecord_id=”sciencemusicvideosMeister1961-Breathe InteractiveLyrics”]

[q labels = “top”]

Welcome to the system we call the __________
How we get O2 in and CO2 out is our story
Because every organism, familiar or strange
Has to carry out ____ exchange

 

In all larger species there’s a respiratory surface
Like a gill or a _____ that evolved for the purpose
Of providing enough surface area for gas _________
In four limbed species lungs are the solution

[l]diffusion

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]gas

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]lung

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]respiratory

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[q labels = “top”]

CHORUS
Breathe, inhale, pull that __________ down
Let the air rush in take in oxygen
Exhale, relax, let the air rush out,
Feel the ______ cords vibrate when you talk or shout.
Feel the air in your nose, then the the pharynx then the glottis, then the larynx then the trachea then left or right _________
To the smallest bronchioles to the _______
Now, let the air out, breathe a happy sigh!

[l]alveoli

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]bronchus

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]diaphragm

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]vocal

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[q labels = “top”]

An _______ molecule outside your nose
Into the nasal cavity it flows
Passing hairs and cells secreting mucus with each inhalation
_______ cells that line this pathway help out with filtration

 

Then to the back of the mouth the O2 passes,
(You know the mouth’s the other pathway for inhaling ______)
That’s why drinking and laughing can (as everybody knows)
Send the liquid that you ______ right out your nose

[l]ciliated

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]drank

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]gases

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]oxygen

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[q labels = “top”]

Next the O2 starts its passage down the windpipe through the ______
Protected by a flap that’s called the epiglottis
Which covers the __________ when we swallow
Makes the esophagus the only path that food can follow

 

So after the back of the mouth, which is also called the ________,
Comes the top of the windpipe, the voicebox or the ______,
The trachea’s next, its many cartilage rings,
Always keep it open, for the air it brings

[l]glottis

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]larynx

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]pharynx

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]windpipe

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[q labels = “top”]

 

The trachea ends when it branches into two
Large bronchi, also known as __________ tubes,
A branching tree forms as the tubes subdivide,
Until they end in hollow sacs called ______

 

Each alveolus has __________ outside it
Through which red blood cells file right by it
___ diffuses into each red blood cell
Which becomes oxygenated makes it feel so swell

[l]O2

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]alveoli

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]bronchial

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]capillaries

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[q labels = “top”]

CO2 oozes in the opposite direction
Moving to the_________, diffusing with perfection
CO2’s out; O2’s in
Fill your ______ with oxygen so

 

Now let’s look at lung __________
The way we power inhalation and exhalation
The thoracic (chest) cavity’s a sealed closed ________
That’s why a chest wound carries so much danger

[l]alveolus

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]chamber

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]lungs

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]ventilation

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[q labels = “top”]

So just below the rib cage in a woman or man
Is a sheet of ______ called the diaphragm
Muscles below the ___________ can pull it down
This powers ventilation let me show you how

 

Inhalation pulls the diaphragm down which __________
Chest cavity volume so the pressure decreases;
The _______ pressure air outside the lungs flows in
The lungs inflate that’s inhalation

[l]diaphragm

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]higher

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]increases

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]tissue

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[q labels = “top”]

To exhale you relax, diaphragm arches ___
Sends chest cavity pressure up
So as chest cavity volume’s __________
The gases in your lungs have to be released so

[l]decreased

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]up

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[/qwiz]

 

5. Breathe! Flashcards Set 1

[qdeck random = “true” qrecord_id=”sciencemusicvideosMeister1961-Resp. Sys. FC1″]

[h]Breathe! Flashcards Set 1

[i]If you haven’t used a set of flashcards on sciencemusicvideos before, here’s what you need to know.

  • Click ‘Check Answer’ to see the answer to each card.
  • If you know it, click ‘Got it.”
  • If you don’t know it as well as you’d like, click ‘Need more practice,’ and that card will go to the bottom of the deck so you can practice it again.
  • ‘Shuffle’ lets you shuffle the deck.

[!]Card 1a[/!]

[q]We need ________ so that we can perform aerobic respiration and make the ATP our cells need in order to do work.

[textentry]

[a]We need oxygen so that we can perform aerobic respiration and make the ATP our cells need in order to do work.

[!]Card 2a[/!]

[q]The function of the ________ system is to bring oxygen into the body, and to remove carbon dioxide.

[textentry]

[a]The function of the respiratory system is to bring oxygen into the body, and to remove carbon dioxide.

[!]Card 3a[/!]

[q]During _____________, glucose is broken down in the presence of oxygen. The waste products are the gas carbon dioxide and the liquid water. The product is ATP.

[textentry]

[a]During cellular respiration, glucose is broken down in the presence of oxygen. The waste products are the gas carbon dioxide and the liquid water. The product is ATP.

[!]Card 4a[/!]

[q]During cellular respiration, glucose is broken down in the presence of oxygen. The waste products are the gas ___________ and the liquid water. The product is ATP.

[textentry]

[a]During cellular respiration, glucose is broken down in the presence of oxygen. The waste products are the gas carbon dioxide and the liquid water. The product is ATP.

[!]Card 5a[/!]

[q]We need ____  in order to provide us with enough surface area for gases to diffuse in and out of our bodies.

[textentry]

[a]We need lungs  in order to provide us with enough surface area for gases to diffuse in and out of our bodies.

[!]Card 6a[/!]

[q]Earthworms exchange gases with the environment through their ____.

[textentry]

[a]Earthworms exchange gases with the environment through their skin.

[!]Card 7a[/!]

[q]All the four-limbed vertebrates (animals with backbones) use _____ in order to exchange gases with the environment.

[textentry]

[a]All the four-limbed vertebrates (animals with backbones) use lungs in order to exchange gases with the environment.

[!]Card 8a[/!]

[q]Most of the air passages in our respiratory system are covered with cells that secrete mucus, and which are lined with tiny ____-like structures called cilia.

[textentry]

[a]Most of the air passages in our respiratory system are covered with cells that secrete mucus, and which are lined with tiny hair-like structures called cilia.

[!]Card 9a[/!]

[q]The function of the tissue that lines our respiratory system is to filter the air of particles, to trap ______causing microorganisms, and to warm the incoming air.

[textentry]

[a]The function of the tissue that lines our respiratory system is to filter the air of particles, to trap disease causing microorganisms, and to warm the incoming air.

[!]Card 10a[/!]

[q]The back of the mouth is also called the ______.

[textentry]

[a]The back of the mouth is also called the pharynx.

[!]Card 11a[/!]

[q]At the pharynx, the nasal cavity joins the ____ cavity.

[textentry]

[a]At the pharynx, the nasal cavity joins the oral cavity.

[!]Card 12a[/!]

[q]The epiglottis is the flap of tissue that closes the opening to the larynx during _________

[textentry]

[a]The epiglottis is the flap of tissue that closes the opening to the larynx during swallowing.

[!]Card 13a[/!]

[q]If you think of the vertebrate respiratory system as a tree, then the ____ would be the trachea.

[textentry]

[a]If you think of the vertebrate respiratory system as a tree, then the trunk would be the trachea.

[!]Card 14a[/!]

[q]Another name for the voicebox is the _____.

[textentry]

[a]Another name for the voicebox is the larynx.

[!]Card 15a[/!]

[q]After the ______, the left and right bronchi branch into ever smaller bronchial tubes.

[textentry]

[a]After the trachea, the left and right bronchi branch into ever smaller bronchial tubes..

[!]Card 16a[/!]

[q]The smallest bronchial tubes are called _________.

[textentry]

[a]The smallest bronchial tubes are called bronchioles.

[!]Card 17a[/!]

[q]The respiratory tree metaphor is based around the idea that the trachea is like the trunk, and the bronchial _____ are like ever-smaller branches.

[textentry]

[a]The respiratory tree metaphor is based around the idea that the trachea is like the trunk, and the bronchial tubes are like ever-smaller branches.

[!]Card 18a[/!]

[q]The thin-walled bubbles of tissue where ___ exchange occurs are called alveoli.

[textentry]

[a]The thin-walled bubbles of tissue where gas exchange occurs are called alveoli.

[!]Card 19a[/!]

[q]During gas exchange in the lungs, ______ flows from the alveoli to the capillaries.

[textentry]

[a]During gas exchange in the lungs, oxygen flows from the alveoli to the capillaries.

[!]Card 20a[/!]

[q]During gas exchange in the lungs, __________ flows from the capillaries to the alveoli.

[textentry]

[a]During gas exchange in the lungs, carbon dioxide flows from the capillaries to the alveoli.

[!]Card 21a[/!]

[q]____ exchange in the lungs occurs through diffusion.

[textentry]

[a]Gas exchange in the lungs occurs through diffusion.

[!]Card 22a[/!]

[q]During diffusion, molecules flow from ______ to lower concentration.

[textentry]

[a]During diffusion, molecules flow from higher to lower concentration.

[!]Card 23a[/!]

[q]During gas exchange in the lungs, both carbon dioxide and oxygen diffuse down their concentration _______.

[textentry]

[a]During gas exchange in the lungs, both carbon dioxide and oxygen diffuse down their concentration gradient.

[!]Card 24a[/!]

[q]During exhalation, the diaphragm arches __. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity decreases. This increases chest cavity air pressure, forcing air to flow out of the lungs.

[textentry]

[a]During exhalation, the diaphragm arches up. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity decreases. This increases chest cavity air pressure, forcing air to flow out of the lungs.

[!]Card 25a[/!]

[q]During exhalation, the diaphragm arches up. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity decreases. This increases chest cavity air _______, forcing air to flow out of the lungs.

[textentry]

[a]During exhalation, the diaphragm arches up. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity decreases. This increases chest cavity air pressure, forcing air to flow out of the lungs.

[!]Card 26a[/!]

[q]During inhalation, muscles pull the diaphragm _____. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity increases. This decreases chest cavity air pressure, allowing air to flow into the lungs.

[textentry]

[a]During inhalation, muscles pull the diaphragm down. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity increases. This decreases chest cavity air pressure, allowing air to flow into the lungs.

[!]Card 27a[/!]

[q]During inhalation, muscles pull the diaphragm down. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity increases. This decreases chest cavity air _______, allowing air to flow into the lungs.

[textentry]

[a]During inhalation, muscles pull the diaphragm down. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity increases. This decreases chest cavity air pressure, allowing air to flow into the lungs.

[x]

[/qdeck]

6. Breathe! Flashcards Set 2

[qdeck random = “true” qrecord_id=”sciencemusicvideosMeister1961-Resp Sys FC 2″]

[h]Breathe! Flashcards Set 1

[i]Another set of flashcards based on the song.SAtart

[!]Card 1b[/!]

[q]We need oxygen so that we can perform ________ respiration and make the ATP our cells need in order to do work.

[textentry]

[a]We need oxygen so that we can perform aerobic respiration and make the ATP our cells need in order to do work.

[!]Card 2b[/!]

[q]The function of the respiratory system is to bring ______ into the body, and to remove carbon dioxide.

[textentry]

[a]The function of the respiratory system is to bring oxygen into the body, and to remove carbon dioxide.

[!]Card 3b[/!]

[q]During cellular respiration, _______ is broken down in the presence of oxygen. The waste products are the gas carbon dioxide and the liquid water. The product is ATP.

[textentry]

[a]During cellular respiration, glucose is broken down in the presence of oxygen. The waste products are the gas carbon dioxide and the liquid water. The product is ATP.

[!]Card 4b[/!]

[q]During cellular respiration, glucose is broken down in the presence of oxygen. The waste products are the gas carbon dioxide and the liquid _____. The product is ATP.

[textentry]

[a]During cellular respiration,glucose is broken down in the presence of oxygen. The waste products are the gas carbon dioxide and the liquid water. The product is ATP.

[!]Card 5b[/!]

[q]We need lungs  in order to provide us with enough __________ for gases to diffuse in and out of our bodies.

[textentry]

[a]We need lungs  in order to provide us with enough surface area for gases to diffuse in and out of our bodies.

[!]Card 6b[/!]

[q]Vertebrates like____ exchange gases with the environment through their gills.

[textentry]

[a]Vertebrates like fish exchange gases with the environment through their gills.

[!]Card 7b[/!]

[q]All the four-limbed vertebrates (animals with backbones) use lungs in order to _______ gases with the environment.

[textentry]

[a]All the four-limbed vertebrates (animals with backbones) use lungs in order to exchange gases with the environment.

[!]Card 8b[/!]

[q]Most of the air passages in our respiratory system are covered with cells that secrete mucus, and which are lined with tiny hair-like structures called ____.

[textentry]

[a]Most of the air passages in our respiratory system are covered with cells that secrete mucus, and which are lined with tiny hair-like structures called cilia.

[!]Card 9b[/!]

[q]The function of the tissue that lines our respiratory system is to filter the air of particles, to trap disease causing microorganisms, and to ____the incoming air.

[textentry]

[a]The function of the tissue that lines our respiratory system is to filter the air of particles, to trap disease causing microorganisms, and to warm the incoming air.

[!]Card 10b[/!]

[q]At the _____, the nasal cavity joins the oral cavity.

[textentry]

[a]At the pharynx, the nasal cavity joins the oral cavity.

[!]Card 11b[/!]

[q]The _____ is the flap of tissue that closes the opening to the larynx during swallowing.

[textentry]

[a]The epiglottis is the flap of tissue that closes the opening to the larynx during swallowing.

[!]Card 12b[/!]

[q]The trachea is held open by rings of ______.

[textentry]

[a]The trachea is held open by rings of cartilage.

[!]Card 13b[/!]

[q]If you think of the vertebrate respiratory system as a tree, then the trunk would be the ______.

[textentry]

[a]If you think of the vertebrate respiratory system as a tree, then the trunk would be the trachea.

[!]Card 14b[/!]

[q]The ____ branches into the left and right bronchi (Note: this is one of those words where the plural ends in “i,” like “octopi”).

[textentry]

[a]The trachea branches into the left and right bronchi (Note: this is one of those words where the plural ends in “i,” like “octopi”).

[!]Card 15b[/!]

[q]After the trachea, the left and right bronchi branch into ever smaller _______ tubes.

[textentry]

[a]After the trachea, the left and right bronchi branch into ever smaller bronchial tubes.

[!]Card 16b[/!]

[q]The respiratory tree metaphor is based around the idea that the _____ is like the trunk, and the bronchial tubes are like ever-smaller branches.

[textentry]

[a]The respiratory tree metaphor is based around the idea that the trachea is like the trunk, and the bronchial tubes are like ever-smaller branches.

[!]Card 17b[/!]

[q]The respiratory tree metaphor is based around the idea that the trachea is like the trunk, and the bronchial tubes are like ever-smaller _______.

[textentry]

[a]The respiratory tree metaphor is based around the idea that the trachea is like the trunk, and the bronchial tubes are like ever-smaller branches.

[!]Card 18b[/!]

[q]The thin-walled bubbles of tissue where gas exchange occurs are called _____.

[textentry]

[a]The thin-walled bubbles of tissue where gas exchange occurs are called alveoli.

[!]Card 19b[/!]

[q]During gas exchange in the lungs, oxygen flows from the _____ to the capillaries.

[textentry]

[a]During gas exchange in the lungs, oxygen flows from the alveoli to the capillaries.

[!]Card 20b[/!]

[q]During gas exchange in the lungs, carbon dioxide flows from the _______ to the alveoli.

[textentry]

[a]During gas exchange in the lungs, carbon dioxide flows from the capillaries to the alveoli.

[!]Card 21b[/!]

[q]Gas exchange in the lungs occurs through _______.

[textentry]

[a]Gas exchange in the lungs occurs through diffusion.

[!]Card 22b[/!]

[q]During diffusion, molecules flow from higher to lower ___________.

[textentry]

[a]During diffusion, molecules flow from higher to lower concentration.

[!]Card 23b[/!]

[q]During ________, the diaphragm arches up. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity decreases. This increases chest cavity air pressure, forcing air to flow out of the lungs.

[textentry]

[a]During exhalation, the diaphragm arches up. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity decreases. This increases chest cavity air pressure, forcing air to flow out of the lungs.

[!]Card 24b[/!]

[q]During exhalation, the diaphragm arches up. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity ________. This increases chest cavity air pressure, forcing air to flow out of the lungs.

[textentry]

[a]During exhalation, the diaphragm arches up. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity decreases. This increases chest cavity air pressure, forcing air to flow out of the lungs.

[!]Card 25b[/!]

[q]During exhalation, the diaphragm arches up. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity decreases. This increases chest cavity air pressure, forcing air to flow ___ of the lungs.

[textentry]

[a]During exhalation, the diaphragm arches up. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity decreases. This increases chest cavity air pressure, forcing air to flow out of the lungs.

[!]Card 26b[/!]

[q]During inhalation, muscles pull the diaphragm down. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity ________. This decreases chest cavity air pressure, allowing air to flow into the lungs.

[textentry]

[a]During inhalation, muscles pull the diaphragm down. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity increases. This decreases chest cavity air pressure, allowing air to flow into the lungs.

[!]Card 27b[/!]

[q]During inhalation, muscles pull the diaphragm down. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity increases. This decreases chest cavity air pressure, allowing air to flow ____ the lungs.

[textentry]

[a]During inhalation, muscles pull the diaphragm down. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity increases. This decreases chest cavity air pressure, allowing air to flow into the lungs.

[x]

[/qdeck]

7. Breathe! Flashcards Set 3

[qdeck random = “true” qrecord_id=”sciencemusicvideosMeister1961-Resp Sys FC 3″]

[h]Breathe! Flashcards

[i]A final set of flashcards based on the song.

[!]Card 1c[/!]

[q]We need oxygen so that we can perform aerobic respiration and make the ____ our cells need in order to do work.

[textentry]

[a]We need oxygen so that we can perform aerobic respiration and make the ATP our cells need in order to do work.

 

[!]Card 2c[/!]

[q]The function of the respiratory system is to bring oxygen into the body, and to remove ____________.

[textentry]

[a]The function of the respiratory system is to bring oxygen into the body, and to remove carbon dioxide.

 

[!]Card 3c[/!]

[q]During cellular respiration, glucose is broken down in the presence of ______. The waste products are the gas carbon dioxide and the liquid water. The product is ATP.

[textentry]

[a]During cellular respiration, glucose is broken down in the presence of oxygen. The waste products are the gas carbon dioxide and the liquid water. The product is ATP.

 

[!]Card 4c[/!]

[q]During cellular respiration, glucose is broken down in the presence of oxygen. The waste products are the gas carbon dioxide and the liquid water. The product is ___.

[textentry]

[a]During cellular respiration, glucose is broken down in the presence of oxygen. The waste products are the gas carbon dioxide and the liquid water. The product is ATP.

 

[q]We need lungs  in order to provide us with enough surface area for gases to ______ in and out of our bodies.

[textentry]

[a]We need lungs  in order to provide us with enough surface area for gases to diffuse in and out of our bodies.

 

[!]Card 6c[/!]

[q]Vertebrates like fish exchange gases with the environment through their ____.

[textentry]

[a]Vertebrates like fish exchange gases with the environment through their gills.

 

[!]Card 7c[/!]

[q]Most of the air passages in our respiratory system are covered with cells that secrete _____, and which are lined with tiny hair-like structures called cilia.

[textentry]

[a]Most of the air passages in our respiratory system are covered with cells that secrete mucus, and which are lined with tiny hair-like structures called cilia.

 

[!]Card 8c[/!]

[q]The function of the tissue that lines our respiratory system is to ____the air of particles, to trap disease causing microorganisms, and to warm the incoming air.

[textentry]

[a]The function of the tissue that lines our respiratory system is to filter the air of particles, to trap disease causing microorganisms, and to warm the incoming air.

 

[!]Card 9c[/!]

[q]The ____of the mouth is also called the pharynx.

[textentry]

[a]The back of the mouth is also called the pharynx.

 

[!]Card 10c[/!]

[q]At the pharynx, the ____cavity joins the oral cavity.

[textentry]

[a]At the pharynx, the nasal cavity joins the oral cavity.

 

[!]Card 11c[/!]

[q]The epiglottis is the flap of tissue that closes the opening to the ____ during swallowing.

[textentry]

[a]The epiglottis is the flap of tissue that closes the opening to the larynx during swallowing.

 

[!]Card 12c[/!]

[q]If you think of the vertebrate respiratory system as a ____, then the trunk would be the trachea.

[textentry]

[a]If you think of the vertebrate respiratory system as a tree, then the trunk would be the trachea.

 

[!]Card 13c[/!]

[q]Another name for the ______ is the larynx.

[textentry]

[a]Another name for the voicebox is the larynx.

 

[!]Card 14c[/!]

[q]The trachea branches into the left and right _____(Note: this is one of those words where the plural ends in “i,” like “octopi”).

[textentry]

[a]The trachea branches into the left and right bronchi (Note: this is one of those words where the plural ends in “i,” like “octopi”).

 

[!]Card 15c[/!]

[q]The smallest bronchial _____ are called bronchioles.

[textentry]

[a]The smallest bronchial tubes are called bronchioles.

 

[!]Card 16c[/!]

[q]The respiratory tree metaphor is based around the idea that the trachea is like the ____, and the bronchial tubes are like ever-smaller branches.

[textentry]

[a]The respiratory tree metaphor is based around the idea that the trachea is like the trunk, and the bronchial tubes are like ever-smaller branches.

 

[!]Card 17c[/!]

[q]The ___-walled bubbles of tissue where gas exchange occurs are called alveoli.

[textentry]

[a]The thin-walled bubbles of tissue where gas exchange occurs are called alveoli.

 

[!]Card 18c[/!]

[q]Each alveolus is surrounded by ______.

[textentry]

[a]Each alveolus is surrounded by capillaries.

 

[!]Card 19c[/!]

[q]During gas exchange in the lungs, oxygen flows from the alveoli to the ________.

[textentry]

[a]During gas exchange in the lungs, oxygen flows from the alveoli to the capillaries.

 

[!]Card 20c[/!]

[q]During gas exchange in the lungs, carbon dioxide flows from the capillaries to the _____.

[textentry]

[a]During gas exchange in the lungs, carbon dioxide flows from the capillaries to the alveoli.

 

[!]Card 21c[/!]

[q]During ________, molecules flow from higher to lower concentration.

[textentry]

[a]During diffusion, molecules flow from higher to lower concentration.

 

[!]Card 22c[/!]

[q]During gas exchange in the lungs, both carbon dioxide and oxygen diffuse ____ their concentration gradient.

[textentry]

[a]During gas exchange in the lungs, both carbon dioxide and oxygen diffuse down their concentration gradient.

 

[!]Card 23c[/!]

[q]During exhalation, the _________ arches up. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity decreases. This increases chest cavity air pressure, forcing air to flow out of the lungs.

[textentry]

[a]During exhalation, the diaphragm arches up. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity decreases. This increases chest cavity air pressure, forcing air to flow out of the lungs.

 

[!]Card 24c[/!]

[q]During exhalation, the diaphragm arches up. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity decreases. This _______ chest cavity air pressure, forcing air to flow out of the lungs.

[textentry]

[a]During exhalation, the diaphragm arches up. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity decreases. This increases chest cavity air pressure, forcing air to flow out of the lungs.

 

[!]Card 25c[/!]

[q]During ________, muscles pull the diaphragm down. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity increases. This decreases chest cavity air pressure, allowing air to flow into the lungs.

[textentry]

[a]During inhalation, muscles pull the diaphragm down. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity increases. This decreases chest cavity air pressure, allowing air to flow into the lungs.

 

[!]Card 26c[/!]

[q]During inhalation, muscles pull the diaphragm down. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity increases. This ________ chest cavity air pressure, allowing air to flow into the lungs.

[textentry]

[a]During inhalation, muscles pull the diaphragm down. As a result, the volume of the chest cavity increases. This decreases chest cavity air pressure, allowing air to flow into the lungs.

 

[x]

[/qdeck]

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