[qwiz dataset=”Membranes Click-on Challenge dataset” qrecord_id=”sciencemusicvideosMeister1961-Membranes Click-on Challenge” quiz_timer=”true” dataset_intro=”false” spaced_repetition=”false” random=”true”]

[h] Cell Membranes Click-on Challenge

[i]Notice the timer in the upper right. Your goal is to work as quickly and accurately as possible.

[q json=”true” hotspot_user_interaction=”label_prompt” dataset_id=”Membranes Click-on Challenge dataset|19048231e0fd4d” question_number=”1″] Cell membrane structure

The letter of the phospholipid bilayer

Yes! It’s “A.” 

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Look carefully at the diagram.What’s the onl y thing that could be made of two layers?
The letter of a glycolipid (a short carbohydrate attached to a phospholipid)

Way to go! “B” is a glycolipid.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Look for a short polymer attached to the tails of a phospholipid. 
The letter of a glycoprotein (a protein with a short carbohydrate attachment).

Very nice! “C” is a glycoprotein.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  Look for a membrane protein with a short polymer extending from it. That polymer is a polysaccharide, and with the protein it makes a glycoprotein
The letter of a transmembrane protein (which isn’t also a channel).

Thumbs up! “D” is a transmembrane protein. 

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Look for a protein that’s going all the way through the membrane, but which doesn’t have an opening that would allow things to enter or leave the cell. 
The letter for cholesterol.

That’s right! “E” is cholesterol.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Cholesterol is represented as four fused carbon rings, about the size of a phospholipid, embedded in the phospholipid bilayer. 
A channel protein

Terrific! “F”is a channel protein.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Find a protein that goes all the way through the membrane, and which has a hole that would allow molecules to move across the membrane. 
The letter for phospholipid heads

 Outstanding! The phospholipid heads are at “F”

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: A phospholipid has a “head” and two fatty acid tails. Find a part of a molecule that’s connected to two tails. That’s the head.
The letter for phospholipid tails.

Superb! “H” represents the phospholipid tails.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: A phospholipid has a “head” and two fatty acid tails. Find a molecule that has two “tails” coming out of it.

[q json=”true” hotspot_user_interaction=”label_prompt” dataset_id=”Membranes Click-on Challenge dataset|1757e9d95f2c9″ question_number=”2″] Phospholipid subunits

Saturated fatty acid tail

Awesome! It’s the straight fatty acid at the top of region 3. 

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  Fatty acids are long hydrocarbons. The saturated one has no double bonds. 
Unsaturated fatty acid tail.

Excellent! The bent fatty acid in region 3 is the unsaturated one. 

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:    Fatty acids are long hydrocarbons. The unsaturated one a double bond within the chain that causes it to bend. 
Glycerol

Exactly! The 3-carbon subunit at “2”  is glycerol. 

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Glycerol is a 3-carbon alcohol that’s at the center of every phospholipid. 
Polar, hydrophilic head

Fantastic! “1” is the polar, hydrophilic head .

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: The head is polar because of charged subunits. Find a phosphate group (and some other charged parts),and you’ll have it. 

[q json=”true” hotspot_user_interaction=”label_prompt” dataset_id=”Membranes Click-on Challenge dataset|c1886a8629f0″ question_number=”3″] Phospholipid cartoon

Hydrophilic head

Right! That big circle is the hydrophilic head.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: A phospholipid has a hydrophilic head and a hydrophobic portion referred to as a tail.What looks like a tail, and what looks like a head?
Hydrophobic tails

Good work! Those are the tails.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: A phospholipid has a hydrophilic head and a hydrophobic portion referred to as a tail.What looks like a tail?

[q json=”true” hotspot_user_interaction=”label_prompt” dataset_id=”Membranes Click-on Challenge dataset|bee5350de1f0″ question_number=”4″] Phospholipids in the membrane.

In a bilayer, this part touches the cytoplasm, or the cell exterior.

Correct! In a bilayer, the head faces the water cell exterior, or the watery cytoplasmic interior. 

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Find the part of the phospholipid that’s hydrophilic and “likes” to interact with water. 
In a bilayer, this part forms a hydrophobic, water-free zone.

Good work! The tails play that role in the bilayer. 

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: You’re looking for the hydrophobic tails.

[q json=”true” hotspot_user_interaction=”label_prompt” dataset_id=”Membranes Click-on Challenge dataset|21deb4a351c945″ question_number=”5″] Membrane Transport (click on the numbers)

The number of a membrane channel

Yes! “5” is a membrane channel.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  A membrane channel allows something to pass through as it flows down its concentration gradient. 
The number of a membrane pump.

Way to go! “6” is a membrane pump.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  A membrane pump moves a substance up a concentration gradient.
The number of the phospholipid bilayer.

Very Nice! “4” is the phospholipid bilayer.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  The phospholipid bilayer forms the structural framework of the membrane. And bilayer means “two layers.”
The number of the arrow that represents facilitated diffusion.

That’s right. “2” is facilitated diffusion.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  In facilitated diffusion,substances enter the cell as they diffusion through a protein channel.
The number of the arrow that represents simple diffusion.

Terrific! “1” represents simple diffusion.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  In simple diffusion, substances diffuse right through the phospholipid bilayer.
The number for the arrow that represents active transport.

Superb! “3” represents active transport.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  In active transport, the cell pumps substances up a concentration gradient.

[q json=”true” hotspot_user_interaction=”label_prompt” dataset_id=”Membranes Click-on Challenge dataset|e31886a8e5f79″ question_number=”6″] Cells and osmosis

The cell is in a hypertonic environment.

Nice going. The shriveled cells are in a hypertonic environment.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  When it’s in a hypertonic environment,  water will leave a cell. 
A cell in an isotonic environment

Excellent! The cells in the middle are in an isotonic environment.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: When cells are in an isotonic environment, water will move in and out at an equal rate.
The cell is in a hypotonic environment.

Good work! The cells on the right are in an hypotonic environment.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: When cells are in a hypotonic environment, water will flow into the cells.

[q json=”true” hotspot_user_interaction=”label_prompt” dataset_id=”Membranes Click-on Challenge dataset|6d76806918bc8″ question_number=”7″] Osmosis in plant cells.

The label for  a hypotonic environment.

Way to go! A cell in a hypotonic environment will swell.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: A cell in a hypotonic environment will swell.
The letter of the vacuole.

Nice! “A” is the central vacuole.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: The vacuole will swell or shrink depending on the cell’s environment. 
The label for a hypertonic environment.

Correct. When a plant cell is in a hypertonic environment, it’s membrane will shrink away from the wall.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: When a plant cell is in a hypertonic environment, it’s membrane will shrink away from the wall.
The letter of the cell wall.

Good word! “B” is the cell wall. 

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  The cell wall is a plant cell’s outer boundary. It’s fairly rigid, and won’t change much in response to the environment. 
The letter of the cell membrane

 Nice! “C” is the cell membrane.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  The membrane, along with the vacuole, is the part that changes the most in response to changes in the cell’s environment.
The letter of the nucleus

Awesome. “D” is the nucleus.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  Look for a part that barely changes, even as the cell’s osmotic environment causes other parts of the cell to change a lot.

[/qwiz]