[qwiz dataset=”DNA and DNA Replication Click On Challenge Dataset” qrecord_id=”sciencemusicvideosMeister1961-DNA and DNA Replication Click-On Challenge” quiz_timer=”true” random=”false” dataset_intro=”false” spaced_repetition=”false” ]

[h] DNA and DNA Replication Click-On Challenge

[i] Note the timer in the top right. Your goal is accuracy and speed. A good strategy: once through slowly, then additional tries for improvement.

[q json=”true” hotspot_user_interaction=”label_prompt” dataset_id=”DNA and DNA Replication Click On Challenge Dataset|20834bfd222f70″ question_number=”1″] DNA Structure (flat representation): Click on the letter.

The letter pointing to a phosphate group

Awesome: “X” is a phosphate group.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  The phosphate group is surrounded by oxygen, and it has a negative charge. 
The letter pointing to the purine (two ring) nitrogenous bases

Correct! “Z” represents the two purine (double-nitrogenous ring) bases.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  The nitrogenous bases are toward the center of the double helix…and these bases have TWO rings.
The letter pointing to deoxyribose.

Very nice! “Y” is deoxyribose.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  Deoxyribose is a five carbon sugar. It’s usually represented as a pentagon, and it’s attached to both a phosphate group and a nitrogenous base.
The letter pointing to thymine

That’s right! “V” is pointing to thymine.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  Thymine binds with adenine, which is a two-ring nitrogenous base represented by the letter “A.”
The letter pointing to hydrogen bonds.

Terrific! “W” is pointing to hydrogen bonds.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  The hydrogen bonds connect the single-ring and the double ring nitrogenous bases.
The letter pointing to the sugar-phosphate backbone.

Superb! “U” is pointing to the sugar-phosphate backbone.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  Find a string of phosphates and deoxyriboses subunits that are bound together.

[q json=”true” hotspot_user_interaction=”label_prompt” dataset_id=”DNA and DNA Replication Click On Challenge Dataset|2186e39ba5901″ question_number=”2″] DNA (double helix): Click on the number.

The number of the sugar-phosphate backbone

Outstanding! “7” is the sugar-phosphate backbone.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: The backbone is a chain of repeating sugars (D) and phosphates (P).
The number of a 5-carbon sugar.

Nice going! “1” is deoxyribose, a 5 carbon sugar.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: The 5 carbon sugar in DNA is deoxyribose.
The number of the functional groups that make DNA an acid.

Incredible. The phosphate groups make DNA acidic.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: It’s the phosphate groups.
The number of the bonds that connect the nitrogenous bases.

Great! It’s the hydrogen bonds at “6.”

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Look for the bonds that connect the nitrogenous bases A with T and C with G.
The number of the sugar-phosphate bonds

Good job! “3” is pointing to sugar-phosphate bonds.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: These are covalent bonds that connect phosphates (P) with deoxyribose sugars (D).
The number of a nucleotide.

Fantastic! “5” is a nucleotide.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Look for a unit with a nitrogenous base, a deoxyribose sugar (D), and a phosphate group (P).
The number of the parts that contain genetic information.

Exactly! It’s the nitrogenous bases (at 4) that contain the genetic information.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Genetic information is stored in the sequence of nitrogenous bases.

[q json=”true” hotspot_user_interaction=”label_prompt” dataset_id=”DNA and DNA Replication Click On Challenge Dataset|181fe5e267c79d” question_number=”3″] Nucleotide

A phosphate group

Awesome! “1” is a phosphate group.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Look for a functional group with a phosphorus atom
The informational part of a nucleotide.

Correct! “3” is a nitrogenous base, one of the letters that make up the genetic code.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: You’re looking for a nitrogenous base, one of the letters that make up the genetic code.
Deoxyribose

Very nice! “2” is deoxyribose.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Deoxyribose is a five-carbon sugar. 

[q json=”true” hotspot_user_interaction=”label_prompt” dataset_id=”DNA and DNA Replication Click On Challenge Dataset|130aeb9e58e483″ question_number=”4″] The replication fork

Helicase

Yes . “B” is helicase. 

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  ”Helicase” means “enzyme that breaks the helix.” 
DNA polymerase

Way to go! “G” is DNA polymerase.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  DNA polymerase is the enzyme that creates new DNA.
RNA Primase

Very nice. Primase is “I”

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  Primase is the enzyme that lays down the RNA primer. An RNA primer is shown at “H.”
Single strand binding proteins.

Thumbs up! Single strand binding proteins are at F.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  The single strand binding proteins bind at the opening of the replication fork, right behind helicase.
RNA primer

That’s right. “H” is an RNA primer.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  At the start of a new strand, RNA primase (at “I”) lays down a short stretch of RNA that’s called a primer. 

[q json=”true” hotspot_user_interaction=”label_prompt” dataset_id=”DNA and DNA Replication Click On Challenge Dataset|f1a8ba0978c7d” question_number=”5″] Replication: Leading and Lagging Strands. Click in the box surrounding the letter of the answer.

The enzyme that separates the DNA so that replication can occur.

Superb. It’s B, helicase.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  You’re looking for DNA helicase. It’s right at the start of the replication fork.
The letter of the enzyme that lays down most of the new DNA

Outstanding! It’s G, DNA Polymerase.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  You’re looking for DNA polymerase.
The letter of the leading strand.

Nice going! “J” is the leading strand.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  On the leading strand, DNA synthesis is continuous.
The letter for the lagging strand.

Incredible. “L” is the lagging strands.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  On the lagging strand, DNA synthesis is fragmentary.
The letter for the RNA primer

Great! “H” is the RNA primer.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  You’re looking for a short stretch of RNA at the beginning of each stretch of NEW DNA.
The letter of the enzyme that replaces the RNA primer with DNA.

Fantastic. It’s “K,” DNA polymerase I.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  Look for DNA Polymerase I. It’s the enzyme that’s removing the RNA prime r and replacing it with DNA.

[q json=”true” hotspot_user_interaction=”label_prompt” dataset_id=”DNA and DNA Replication Click On Challenge Dataset|231303e5e6b0a5″ question_number=”6″] Replication bubble: Click on the numbers

The number of the  original DNA (parent strands)

Awesome. “1” is the original DNA.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: DNA polymerase lays down new DNA, represented in light blue.
The number of the enzyme that opens up DNA so that replication can occur.

Correct! It’s “2,” helicase.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: You’re looking for helicase. It’s as the very opening of the replication fork. 
The number of DNA Polymerase III

Excellent. “3” is DNA polymerase III.

HINT FOR NEXT TIME:  This is the enzyme that synthesizes the newly made DNA strand.
An Okazaki fragment.

Exactly! “5” is an Okazaki fragment. 

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Look for the short segments of newly synthesized DNA on the lagging strand.
The number of new DNA on the leading strand.

Fantastic: “4” is DNA that’s being synthesized on the leading strand. 

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Look for DNA that’s continuous (synthesized in one piece).
The number of an entire replication fork (with none of the component parts numbered).

Great! “6” is a replication fork

HINT FOR NEXT TIME: Find an opening replication fork without any of the component parts numbered.

[/qwiz]